Correction: Stranded Raccoon storyJune 13, 2018 2:51pm

ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — In a story June 13 about a raccoon scaling a building in St. Paul, Minnesota, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the building was the UBS Tower. The building's formal name is UBS Plaza.

A corrected version of the story is below:

Raccoon scales St. Paul office tower, captivating public

A stranded raccoon is generating a lot of social media interest as it scales an office building in downtown St. Paul

ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — A raccoon stranded on the ledge of a building in St. Paul, Minnesota, captivated onlookers and generated interest on social media after it started scaling an office building.

Onlookers and reporters tracked the critter's progress at it climbed the UBS Plaza on Tuesday, interrupting work and causing anxiety for some. By Wednesday morning it had made it to the roof of the building, easing fears that it would plummet to its death.

St. Paul Animal Control put a trap and cat food on the roof, hoping to bring the raccoon down safely.

Nearby Minnesota Public Radio branded the raccoon with the hashtag #mprraccoon. The woodland creature also had its own Twitter account, with one tweet saying, "I made a big mistake." Many feared for the raccoon's safety.

The raccoon was first spotted on a ledge Tuesday morning.

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